Archive for the ‘How’ Category

Refined Manners

Thursday, July 24th, 2014
London Guide, Herb Lester Associates, Anna Hurley, 2013

London Guide, Herb Lester Associates, Anna Hurley, 2013

Here’s one of the differences between being a surgeon and a designer: surgeons are required to be meticulous and have an OCD level to details. If they are, in most probability, people live and have healthy outcomes. Designers are required to be meticulous and have an OCD level to details also. If we are, nobody except another OCD designer notices. The upside is that bad word-spacing doesn’t kill people.

I can spend hours kerning the crap out of a headline. Does anyone apart from me care, or notice? Probably not. We zoom in to a gazillion percent to make sure a point is absolutely precise, obsess over the difference between Adobe Bodoni and Monotype Bodoni. But of we didn’t, we’d be slobs and hack designers, and it wouldn’t be as much fun.

Herb Lester Associates produces a wonderful collection of guides to different cities. Let’s face it, most city guides look like the Map to the Stars Homes. The Herb Lester guides are not only pertinent to travelers who prefer something more interesting than mobbed, but are detailed to death. Every tiny piece of type has been considered. The illustrations are wonderful and change from map to map. I know the designers were working on a the files at 400%, and it shows. Even the packing tape on the envelope is a work of art (which I plan to steal).

In this instance, I noticed. Every thoughtful and beautifully crafted detail adds to the overall extraordinariness of the guides. The lesson here, go ahead and fine tune the shit out of the details. If only one person in the world sees it, you’ve succeeded.

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Not a Prostitute on the Ground

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

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I was talking with a friend yesterday who told me he was tired and depressed. He felt like he was in a rut, getting older, wasn’t in a relationship, and just felt crummy. I tried to help by pointing out that he had a new orange shirt which was very nice and a new pair of gym shorts. I told him that getting older wasn’t bad, since the alternative wasn’t so good. And I suggested he should be glad he wasn’t in a relationship. What if he were, and went home to be beaten every night. “See,” I said, “You’re lucky. You have a new shirt, aren’t dead, and nobody is beating you at home every night.”

This advice wasn’t particularly helpful. Even I could tell that the “Glad Game” wasn’t working. So I told him to go home and watch any Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland movie. Babes in Arms and Babes on Broadway are especially cheerful. You know the standard plot: The orphanage is about to be sold and the poor urchins will be put on the street, so the local kids get together and decide to put a show on in the barn or street to raise money. Mickey and Judy round everyone up and their friends are all incredibly talented and hammy. They put on giant production numbers at the drop of a hat. A powerful show business executive discovers them. They raise money and the orphanage is saved.

God’s Country, in Babes in Arms, has a rousing finale with lots of American flags. But my favorite is Hoe Down from Babes on Broadway. It’s fresh and wholesome. It’s good American farm life with a snappy rhythm. Of course, these were made right before and at the beginning of World War II. So there is a fair amount of patriotism, nostalgia for simple values, and innocent teenagers. These are a perfect antidote to those days when anyone is feeling sad.

And if that’s not enough, there’s always Polyanna. Don’t worry, I’ve been told to not pursue therapy as a career.

Have patience and get through the advertisement above, it worth the wait.

 

 

Damn the Torpedoes, Full Steam Ahead!

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014
Sean Adams, Noreen Morioka with drinks as usual

Sean Adams, Noreen Morioka with drinks as usual

Last Friday night, Noreen and I were awarded the AIGA Medal at the AIGA Centennial Gala. As Nancye Green said after the first AIGA gala, “This is like the best high school reunion with everyone you’ve ever known.” It was the most successful gala in AIGA’s history and proves that we still care about design and designers above all else.

Michael Bierut summed up the essence of the evening by pointing out that almost every Medalist talked about someone in the room who gave them his or her first job, or someone in the room they had hired. That AIGA is about our community was made exceptionally clear at this event. There was no mean-spiritedness, envious disregard, or minimizing of another designer. Nobody had the attitude that success was finite and another’s meant less for them. There was an honest sense of pride and pleasure for everyone’s successes. We may think, as designers, we are competitive and cut-throat, but compared to other professions, we’re pussycats and pretty damned supportive of each other.

There’s been a huge amount of discourse over AIGA’s direction over the last year. Last term, a student in Nicole Jacek’s Art Center class asked me why there was so much arguing. But this isn’t arguing. It’s discourse. It’s what happens when people are deeply committed and passionate. It’s what every organization hopes to have. The opposite is a listless disengaged community. We have emerged from a major shift in AIGA’s history that will lead to decades of stability and vitality.

As designers, we all have the predilection to critique and analyze. We may have various opinions on the day to day issues of the community, but it was clear at the gala that, in the end, we are all working to the same goal.

As I was sitting there, watching the other Medalists accept their award, I found myself feeling that sensation we all share; seeing something wonderful and having that contradictory sensation of the joy of discovery and that twinge of envy that someone else made it. I tend to use one too many sailing metaphors, but in this instance, going forward, I can only think of Franklin Roosevelt’s quote, “To reach a port we must set sail. Sail, not tie at anchor. Sail, not drift.”

Angela Jimenez Photography:

Chip Kidd, April Greiman, Jim Cross, Agustin Garza, Dana Arnett, Jennifer Morla, Sean Adams, Michael Vanderbyl, photo: Jennifer Sterling

Chip Kidd, April Greiman, Jim Cross, Agustin Garza, Dana Arnett, Jennifer Morla, Sean Adams, Michael Vanderbyl, photo: Jennifer Sterling

Leslie Smolan, Ken Carbone, Anne Willoughby, Sean Adams

Leslie Smolan, Ken Carbone, Anne Willoughby, Sean Adams

Jennifer Morla, Eric Madsen, Michael Vanderbyl

Jennifer Morla, Eric Madsen, Michael Vanderbyl

Seam Adams, Kim Rogala, Pam Williams, Marylou Domian, Lisa House

Seam Adams, Kim Rogala, Pam Williams, Marylou Domian, Lisa House

Noreen not drunk

Noreen not drunk

AIGA Medalists

AIGA Medalists

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table centerpiece

 

Let’s try that once more

Friday, April 11th, 2014

 

I’m making a new course for Lynda.com. This course, Fundamentals of Layout: Marketing Collateral, gave me the chance to talk about issue such as designing a letterhead, business card, poster, even swag. I wrote the course, did the read throughs, and created the visual assets. I thought I was so all together.

For this course, we relied mostly on visual references and text slides. This meant I spent less time in front of the camera and more in the sound booth recording the voice-over. I did, however, need to film the introductions and conclusions to each movie. This all seemed like no problem until I realized that I couldn’t use a teleprompter for these. I needed to memorize each of the sections of the scripts that had live action. Now this doesn’t sound too hard. I wrote them, I know what I’m talking about. But it was one of the most harrowing days of my life. It was like a 12 hour day having a root canal.

Take after take, I would stumble through, getting 25 % right, or 75%, but never perfect. I had that disembodied feeling like my mouth kept moving and making odd sounds that seemed like words but made no sense. The more I goofed up, the more freaked out I was. My producer, Susan, was beyond patient and encouraging, telling me in my headset, “No problem, we’ll get there,” and, “That was great.” But I’m sure she wanted to blow her brains out sitting in the production room. I kept thinking about the scene in Inside Daisy Clover when Daisy (Natalie Wood) freaks out doing a dubbing. I stopped short of clawing at the window screaming.

The Avant Garde in Felt

Monday, March 10th, 2014
Sean Adams, AIGA 100 project: 1955

Sean Adams, AIGA 100 project: 1955

A few weeks ago, I was asked to create a solution for an AIGA project celebrating the 100 year anniversary. 100 designers were asked to choose a year, and design a piece that highlighted an event from that year. Michael Bierut got to 1968 before I could, so I took 1955. In 1955, the Ford Thunderbird was released and Disneyland opened. Obviously, Disneyland ended up as my subject.

As a roundabout explanation of the process, I’ve been a huge Cathy of California fan for years. I was having lunch at our local groovy Los Feliz Mexican restaurant, Mexico City, when I recognized Cathy Callahan herself. I’m not easily impressed by celebrity. I’ve met my share of famous actors and such. But I was super freaked meeting Cathy in real life and probably a babbling fool.

Around the time I started the 1955 project, I bought Cathy’s book, Vintage Craft Workshop: Fresh Takes on Twenty-Four Classic Projects from the ’60s and ’70s. Something clicked, or broke, in my brain, and I decided to make my piece out of craft materials. It seemed fitting for a 1955 concept and I obviously have too much time on my hands. I could have cheated and Photoshopped the whole thing from stock images, but I actually went to Michael’s craft supplies (that was a terrifying experience) and bought stuff.

I cut up my felt, raffia, burlap, and glitter paper. I found old buttons and cufflinks. I used the hot glue gun to attach the stuff to the burlap (which smells weird), and voila. I know most designers are looking for a cutting edge, an extreme approach to the avant grade, and the next big thing. I now have clear evidence that I am as far from hip and cutting edge as Lawrence Welk or Barry Goldwater. At the same time, I think my craft solution this proves that I am incredibly brave or, more likely, clueless.

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