Archive for the ‘Instructions’ Category

The Oldest Living Rubylith User

Thursday, February 19th, 2015
Old school Photoshop

Old school Photoshop

Several weeks ago, I was asked to do a short segment for the 25th Anniversary of Photoshop. It sounded fun until I was told I would need to demonstrate some of the tools used before Photoshop. First, this was an honor and scary at the same time. It was wonderful to be asked, but was I the last living designer who remembers what a rubylith was? And then the thought of showing how we used these tools after 25 years was challenging. But, what the heck? If I got any of it wrong, I was the last one alive to know.

During the shoot, I realized that the rapidographs weren’t working and I didn’t have a true square edge to the drafting table. I hoped that nobody would notice this. But I was surprised how quickly I recalled the process. I didn’t have time to mix the rubber cement to the right consistency, or cut the ruby exactly (you’ll know what that means if you are old). I liked how meditative the process was. It was slow and careful, a true craft. My hands even got dirty with ink and rubber cement boogers.

When I was finished with my demonstration, I kind of missed the old days of typesetting, the waxing machine, and the quiet concentration of making a mechanical. I recall going to AIGA events in New York in my early 20s. I would see Massimo Vignelli who was always kind and oddly remembered my name. He was flawless in his Massimo simple black and white clothes. Or Ken Carbone, who was also dressed in the most relentlessly crisp white shirts. I had my khakis, pink oxfords, and repp ties with bits of rubber cement, glue, and pieces of tape. I could never understand how everyone else stayed so clean. That was the true secret of life before Photoshop.

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The Meaning of a Second

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015
1966

1966

Like most of you, I have a closet of plastic shoeboxes filled with printed photos. Last week began scanning many of them. One of them is the image above of my grandmother, mother, aunt, and me sitting on the steps with dappled light. It’s not particularly well composed, but it feels like summer. It reminded me of the scene in Blade Runner, when Harrison Ford looks through his own family photos. For a second, the light dappling on the subject of the photo he holds begins to move.

That scene has its roots in Chris Marker’s La Jettée. La Jetée is the story later remade into 12 Monkeys. It was created with only still images, no motion. But there is one moment in the film when, for a brief second, one of the characters opens her eyes. Then the film continues with the series of still images.

A similar concept is used in Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up. A series of black and white photographs display the sequence of events of a murder. There is no motion, but the sound of the trees is added to strengthen the narrative. The effect in all of these is an increased sense of connection for the viewer.

I may be simple, but it’s those quiet moves that I like in a film. I’m okay with blowing up spaceships too, but I think Guardians of the Galaxy would have been improved with a sequence of still images and the sound of trees.


sequence begins at 1:00


Blade Runner


Blow Up, sequence begins at 1:15

Nothing

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014
Richard Danne

Richard Danne

I’ll keep this simple. I like work that doesn’t try too hard. It’s so easy to work on a project until I’ve beaten every last bit of life from it. It’s good to know when to stop. And the work I like best looks like the designer did one thing like set the type in Akzidenz Grotesk and then said, “Yeah, I’m done.” Perfect.

Young designers tell me all the time, “Are you sure, it seems empty.” But the idea makes it full, and in fact it’s not empty, it’s filled with a ton of negative space. I think of it like dark energy and dark matter. It’s strong enough to hold everything together. I deeply covet Richard Danne’s desk calendar from 1974. I think there’s that place in hell that I’ve mentioned before (the one where amateur musicians pull a guitar out at a party) for people who steal. But, I’d steal it.

All of these projects are confident and clear. They resonate with harmony because every tiny detail has been refined, refined, and refined. So try this on your next project. Do one thing and stop. It’ll be hard and the evil workings of layers in Photoshop or Illustrator will be calling, “Add more, add more.” Resist.

Richard Danne

Richard Danne

Paul Rand business card

Paul Rand business card

Please note the call room number

Please note the call room number

Ray Eames

Ray Eames

Reid Miles

Reid Miles

Brownjohn, Chermayeff and Geismar

Brownjohn, Chermayeff and Geismar

A.G. Franzoni

A.G. Franzoni

Fridolin Müller

Fridolin Müller

John Massey

John Massey

George Tscherny

George Tscherny

George Tscherny

George Tscherny

Paul Rand

Paul Rand

Louis Danziger

Louis Danziger

Carson/Roberts

Carson/Roberts

Richard Danne

Richard Danne

Refined Manners

Thursday, July 24th, 2014
London Guide, Herb Lester Associates, Anna Hurley, 2013

London Guide, Herb Lester Associates, Anna Hurley, 2013

Here’s one of the differences between being a surgeon and a designer: surgeons are required to be meticulous and have an OCD level to details. If they are, in most probability, people live and have healthy outcomes. Designers are required to be meticulous and have an OCD level to details also. If we are, nobody except another OCD designer notices. The upside is that bad word-spacing doesn’t kill people.

I can spend hours kerning the crap out of a headline. Does anyone apart from me care, or notice? Probably not. We zoom in to a gazillion percent to make sure a point is absolutely precise, obsess over the difference between Adobe Bodoni and Monotype Bodoni. But of we didn’t, we’d be slobs and hack designers, and it wouldn’t be as much fun.

Herb Lester Associates produces a wonderful collection of guides to different cities. Let’s face it, most city guides look like the Map to the Stars Homes. The Herb Lester guides are not only pertinent to travelers who prefer something more interesting than mobbed, but are detailed to death. Every tiny piece of type has been considered. The illustrations are wonderful and change from map to map. I know the designers were working on a the files at 400%, and it shows. Even the packing tape on the envelope is a work of art (which I plan to steal).

In this instance, I noticed. Every thoughtful and beautifully crafted detail adds to the overall extraordinariness of the guides. The lesson here, go ahead and fine tune the shit out of the details. If only one person in the world sees it, you’ve succeeded.

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Not a Prostitute on the Ground

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

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I was talking with a friend yesterday who told me he was tired and depressed. He felt like he was in a rut, getting older, wasn’t in a relationship, and just felt crummy. I tried to help by pointing out that he had a new orange shirt which was very nice and a new pair of gym shorts. I told him that getting older wasn’t bad, since the alternative wasn’t so good. And I suggested he should be glad he wasn’t in a relationship. What if he were, and went home to be beaten every night. “See,” I said, “You’re lucky. You have a new shirt, aren’t dead, and nobody is beating you at home every night.”

This advice wasn’t particularly helpful. Even I could tell that the “Glad Game” wasn’t working. So I told him to go home and watch any Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland movie. Babes in Arms and Babes on Broadway are especially cheerful. You know the standard plot: The orphanage is about to be sold and the poor urchins will be put on the street, so the local kids get together and decide to put a show on in the barn or street to raise money. Mickey and Judy round everyone up and their friends are all incredibly talented and hammy. They put on giant production numbers at the drop of a hat. A powerful show business executive discovers them. They raise money and the orphanage is saved.

God’s Country, in Babes in Arms, has a rousing finale with lots of American flags. But my favorite is Hoe Down from Babes on Broadway. It’s fresh and wholesome. It’s good American farm life with a snappy rhythm. Of course, these were made right before and at the beginning of World War II. So there is a fair amount of patriotism, nostalgia for simple values, and innocent teenagers. These are a perfect antidote to those days when anyone is feeling sad.

And if that’s not enough, there’s always Polyanna. Don’t worry, I’ve been told to not pursue therapy as a career.

Have patience and get through the advertisement above, it worth the wait.