Mutilated Bodies

July 14th, 2014 by Sean
Herb Lubalin poster, Davida Typeface, Louis Minott, 1965

Herb Lubalin poster, Davida Typeface, Louis Minott, 1965

Some fonts are bad. They are like that photo of a horrible car crash that you can never unsee. It’s not because they are cursed or especially ugly (well, some are), it’s because they have been mutilated and left to die. As I’ve grown older, I’m drawn to typefaces that may, perhaps, strain the limits of good taste.

Last week, I used Davida, designed by Louis Minott in 1965, on an annual report project. Noreen suggested I was not following the corporate system and could be opening the door to future infractions. I saw it as adding some zest and excitement. I see so much good taste sans-serif typography on a daily basis that I’m starving for something wrong.

The problem was getting a good cut of Davida. The original is really well drawn and formed. But someone along the way discovered it in the bin of forgotten typefaces and beat it regularly. The digital version is a far cry from where it began. It’s been around the block. My only choice is to redraw it myself and try to save it.

The lesson here is to find the original version of any font, see what it was meant to be before someone redrew it in a dark basement. I pledge to continue to rehabilitate Davida regardless of the current typographic style du jour.

 334010_CAFEDUMONDE_BEIGNETMIX

Good-DavidaDavida3 Davida1Louis-MinottP1050758

The Friendly Swiss

July 8th, 2014 by Sean
Herbert Matter, Swiss travel poster, 1932

Herbert Matter, Swiss travel poster, 1932

There are two sayings in Hollywood that I like: “The ass you kick on the way up is the one you kiss on the way down,” and “Blame others, take credit, deny everything.” I know quite a few people that live by the motto of blame, credit, etc., and ignore the ass kicking advice. I’ve known fine designers who, after the first taste of fame, became heinous and awful divas making demands and driving kind conference organizers to tears. And I know fine designers who have been famous for years and are the first to wrestle credit away from others. My friend, John Bielenberg, suggested I start a magazine or blog that is like Vanity Fair of the design world, telling all the stories. That sounds fun, but I’d like to keep at least the few friends I still have.

Conversely, I am endlessly amazed at the down to earth, generous nature of some of the industries legends. 90% of them are just good people, willing to help others, devote time, and always have a funny story at dinner. From what I understand, Herbert Matter was one of the least pompous designers in the field. I’ve never heard anything that paints him as difficult or negative. From all accounts, he was a true mensch. You wouldn’t expect that from his work. It’s so brilliant and confident that the author would have all the right in the world to be a jerk. But, it’s proof that either we as designers are, on the whole, pretty darned good. Or we’re nitwits and falling behind while other in different professions claw, stab, and blackmail their way to the top.

Don’t be alarmed, three “Herbert” stories in a row does not mean the next one will be about Herbert Hoover.

2362 2361 2360 1989 1988 19871982 herbert-matter-cover-design23472356 2355 2354 2353 2352 2351 2350 2349 2348

Rundschrift

July 4th, 2014 by Sean

 

Herbert Bayer, Die Neue Linie, March 1937

Herbert Bayer, Die Neue Linie, March 1937

Many of you have written and asked, “Sean, do you have any more Herbert Bayer stuff to share?” Of course I do. Who knew there were so many Bayer fans? I thought nobody had any concept of anything pre-Brady Bunch, so this is a wonderful discovery. I don’t have any snapshots or scandalous photos of Herb doing some wacky thing during Octoberfest, but I’ve got type. For your holiday weekend enjoyment, here are some of Bayer’s typeface designs.

4940 4939 4938 4937 4936 4935 4934 4933

Stationery: spelled with an “e” for envelope

June 30th, 2014 by Sean
Herbert Bayer, Letterhead Design, 1932

Herbert Bayer, Letterhead Design, 1932

 

My friend, Kathy McCoy, recently asked if I had any Herbert Bayer images from his Colorado days. She checked with Lou Danziger who pointed out that we were the caretakers of his monumental slide archive of graphic design. After I pulled everything together, it was obvious that Bayer designed a lot of stationery, and I mean a lot.

The world is screaming insanely, “Print is dead, print is dead, the end is near!”  People may not be using letterhead for a casual note that can work on email, but they still use it in more formal situations. The good part of this is that clients want the best stationery with the options, not the down and dirty cheapest one. Now it really matters.

Bayer designed most of these at the Bauhaus and before he emigrated to the United States. The letterheads are all asymmetrical, use the golden section as a guide, and are designed for functionality. Since Modernism demanded that functional should be paramount, this makes sense.

When I design a letterhead I like to help the user also; add a short rule to delineate the fold, put a bullet where the date is typed, and guides that identify the margin.

Bayer takes this a little more seriously by identifying the location of every type of information. I’m certain that nobody tried to use too small of a margin or fail to line the date up with the type. I get the sense that this would have been a pretty serious infraction and all hell would break loose in the halls of the Bauhaus.

 

13954914 4912 4605 4571 4570 4568 4567 4566 4565 1949 13961289 1288 1286 1285 1260 1259 1258 1257

 

 

Sense and Sensibility

June 26th, 2014 by Sean
Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.05.21 PM

Foundations of Layout and Composition: Marketing Collateral

Call me old-fashioned, but I think it’s important for a designer to know certain basic issues like the size of a business card and what information belongs on an envelope. Nevertheless, I see a great number of portfolios that have envelopes with phone and fax numbers, business cards that are unwieldy and oddly sized, and examples of 3-dimensional promotion that goes against the laws of physics. No this isn’t the fault of the owner of the portfolio. Clearly nobody took the time to explain these basic issues. I’m guilty of this myself. I’ve often talked to students and assumed someone else already taught them the information.

So, I can complain and be the cranky designer who laments that world isn’t what it was when I was a youngster, or I can help. When the good folks at Lynda.com asked me what course I’d like to do next, I suggested we dig deeper into basic issues of layout and composition and move into the stuff we make. Foundations of Layout and Composition: Marketing Collateral gave me a chance to start at the beginning with issues like audience, determining a budget, and what items to produce. I then added basic information on business cards, letterhead, swag, 3-d promotion, and posters.

I’m hoping the examples I use are interesting and inspiring. I rounded up some of my favorite firms like Eight and a Half and Modern Dog. But the main goal is to explain simply the most basic information with collateral. Don’t get me wrong; I’m fine with something being unexpected. In fact it should be. But it’s best when you know why it’s not ordinary. Nobody should be in the position that I witnessed a couple of weeks ago:

Me: Why did you decide to make the letterhead a unique size?

Designer: What?

Me: I’m not sure that a 5×7 card is a poster. What was your intention?

Designer: What?

Me: Is the envelope mailable? It looks like it will fall apart and cost a ton in postage.

Designer: Why are you so mean?

Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.32.08 PM Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.31.30 PM

Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.03.01 PM

Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.04.27 PM Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.03.52 PM Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.05.04 PM Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.04.48 PM Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.07.11 PM Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.02.17 PM Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 3.07.55 PM