Franklin Mint

I've been asked if I have a favorite typeface. I'd like to consider myself type-tolerant, but I'm actually rather a type snob. Most projects begin with me trying something outlandish such as Behemoth. But, as time passes, I slowly migrate back to Franklin Gothic. When I found the 51st Annual of Advertising and Editorial Design for The Art Director's Club of New York, I found a gold mine. Giant Franklin Gothic and my favorite shades of orange and yellow. The book was designed by Dennis Mazzella. In the credits, its states: with the help of Kurt Weihs, my friend. I don't know what that means, so I'll include it to give credit to all parties. I also love that this book is stamped by my friend Doug Boyd. It's a double treasure.

I am in love with the unashamed enormous Franklin Gothic slipcase and cover. So much in love that I considered not sharing this so I could file it in my memory bank of possible solutions. And the spine, showing the inductees into the Hall of Fame is wonderful. Everybody gets so hung up on spines having all the information, but really, in this case on a designer's bookshelf, is anyone going to say, "Well, I dunno. What the hell is that thing?" And how many times have I spent designing countless covers for an annual report because every tiny detail means something to someone in the room. This cover solves that problem. "All we want are the facts. Just the facts, ma'am."

Sean Adams

Sean Adams is the Chair of the undergraduate and graduate Graphic Design Program at ArtCenter, founder of Burning Settlers Cabin studio, and on-screen author for LinkedIn Learning/Lynda.com He is the only two term AIGA national president in AIGA’s 100 year history. In 2014, Adams was awarded the AIGA Medal, the highest honor in the profession. He is an AIGA Fellow, and Aspen Design Fellow. He has been recognized by every major competition and publication including; How, Print, Step, Communication Arts, Graphis, AIGA, The Type Directors Club, The British Art Director’s Club, and the Art Director’s Club. Adams has been exhibited often, including a solo exhibition at The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Adams is an author of multiple magazine columns, and several best-selling books. He has been cited as one of the forty most important people shaping design internationally, and one of the top ten influential designers in the United States. Previously, Adams was a founding partner at AdamsMorioka, whose clients included The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Disney, Mohawk Fine Papers, The Metropolitan Opera, Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, Richard Meier & Partners, Sundance, and the University of Southern California.

The Award Awards 2

AIGA 1962

A few months ago, I posted some of the remarkable awards Lou Danziger gave me. We’ve considered framing them and putting them on our conference wall. It would look very impressive. But, a potential client might not understand how we won an award in 1962. A young woman, who was showing Noreen her portfolio, asked her if her father had started AdamsMorioka with me. So I guess I could pass for winning these, and Noreen could be the younger daughter of my original business partner.

I’ve always thought it was somewhat cheesy to have a wall of awards. We like to take the stance of, “We won’t boast.” We put our awards in a filing cabinet somewhere. If they were as beautiful as Lou’s was, though, I’d pull them up and fill a wall. Or maybe I’ll just use Lou’s and place them too high to read clearly.

AIGA 1970

AIGA Membership

Art Director's Club of Chicago

CA 1963

Art Directors Club of Los Angeles

Art Directors Club of Los Angeles, 1956

Art Directors Club of Los Angeles

New York Art Directors Club 1960

The Award Awards

AIGA 1962

Terry Lee Stone and I were talking about the good old days of competitions.  We both agreed that we loved all of the printed ephemera that was produced each year for either AIGA 365, or the New York Art Director’s Club Show, or Western Art Director’s Club. I know this is really, really bad. It’s not a sustainable practice, and the world is a more caring place now that we do these communications digitally. But, to be asked to design everything from the poster to the award certificate for one of these competitions was a choice project. When Lou Danziger was moving out of his studio, one of Frank Gehry’s first buildings, he called Noreen and me and asked if we wanted anything. We managed to walk away with a George Nelson H leg table, Lou’s custom wood flat files, a copy stand, and Lou’s box of awards. For 15 years, the awards been carefully archived away.

Now, they have been released and some are displayed here. I especially love the 1962 AIGA award, presumably designed by George Tscherny. The “XIX” award can be seen on the walls of Sterling Cooper on Mad Men. The green and pink NYADC club award from 1963 has the most incredible swirls. And, finally, the AIGA mailing label on the tube, I know Paul Rand designed the AIGA logo, and the multi-talented Bart Crosby refined it, but this is tempting.

ADLA as seen on Mad Men

NYADC 1963

AIGA mailing label

ADLA

AIGA 1963

AIGA 1956

AIGA 1964

CA 1963

ADLA