Posts Tagged ‘The Office of Charles and Ray Eames’

Surprised by Joy

Saturday, May 3rd, 2014

RayEames

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Each term, I pull the Art Center Graphics Gallery together. It’s exciting to see the breadth of work produced, and get a sense of the tone of the department. At the end of the Spring term as I was waiting for a batch of posters to arrive, I wandered into the Alyce de Roulet Williamson Gallery, which is behind the student gallery. The current exhibition is Ray Eames: In the Spotlight. Now this is a case of discovering something wonderful in your own backyard. I’ve walked by the gallery several times a week, but was always too busy to stop. Boy, that was dumb.

When I finally stepped in, I was shocked to find the best exhibition I’ve seen in years. After multiple visits to the great museums of Europe and New York, this was the one collection that inspired me the most. The exhibition highlights Ray’s work, not just more Eames LCW chairs. It contains the incredible collections in her drawers, the rack of slide carrousels, her early artwork, even her own incredibly tailored dresses. The density of visual ephemera is remarkable. This isn’t an exhibition for minimalists. But there is a rigor and tightness to the chaos, and an unrelenting sense of optimism. Even the Computer House of Cards talks about the beginnings of things and the possibilities of technology.

Of course, I wanted to buy many of the items, but since it was a gallery exhibition, they said no.

Liberty and Freedom in Grids

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

The World of Franklin & Jefferson, cover, 1976

I like odd grids. How’s that for a catchy opening at a cocktail party? Probably not too good. Nevertheless, complicated and unexpected grids are wonderful. One of my favorite examples is the structure for the book, The World of Franklin and Jefferson, created for the exhibition of the same name. United States Information Agency and the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration proposed the exhibition with funding from IBM. The exhibit toured New York, Paris, Warsaw, London, Mexico City, Chicago, and Los Angeles and was one of the last major works completed by the Eames Office. The accompanying book’s structure is, let’s be honest, bizarre. There are almost no margins. The italic captions have their own column in the center of the page. The images seem to invade the text like wild animals. Clearly, there is a structure under here I do not understand. But I love it. It’s a world of wackadoodle grids. Now, that’s a good title for a new design book.

The World of Franklin & Jefferson, spread, 1976

 

The World of Franklin & Jefferson, spread, 1976

 

The World of Franklin & Jefferson, spread, 1976

 

The World of Franklin & Jefferson, spread, 1976