Posts Tagged ‘Reid Miles’

Nothing

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014
Richard Danne

Richard Danne

I’ll keep this simple. I like work that doesn’t try too hard. It’s so easy to work on a project until I’ve beaten every last bit of life from it. It’s good to know when to stop. And the work I like best looks like the designer did one thing like set the type in Akzidenz Grotesk and then said, “Yeah, I’m done.” Perfect.

Young designers tell me all the time, “Are you sure, it seems empty.” But the idea makes it full, and in fact it’s not empty, it’s filled with a ton of negative space. I think of it like dark energy and dark matter. It’s strong enough to hold everything together. I deeply covet Richard Danne’s desk calendar from 1974. I think there’s that place in hell that I’ve mentioned before (the one where amateur musicians pull a guitar out at a party) for people who steal. But, I’d steal it.

All of these projects are confident and clear. They resonate with harmony because every tiny detail has been refined, refined, and refined. So try this on your next project. Do one thing and stop. It’ll be hard and the evil workings of layers in Photoshop or Illustrator will be calling, “Add more, add more.” Resist.

Richard Danne

Richard Danne

Paul Rand business card

Paul Rand business card

Please note the call room number

Please note the call room number

Ray Eames

Ray Eames

Reid Miles

Reid Miles

Brownjohn, Chermayeff and Geismar

Brownjohn, Chermayeff and Geismar

A.G. Franzoni

A.G. Franzoni

Fridolin Müller

Fridolin Müller

John Massey

John Massey

George Tscherny

George Tscherny

George Tscherny

George Tscherny

Paul Rand

Paul Rand

Louis Danziger

Louis Danziger

Carson/Roberts

Carson/Roberts

Richard Danne

Richard Danne

Unsinkable Brown

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

unknown, Buffalo Bill's Wild West

Recently, a client asked for brown as a color option on a project. A couple of years ago, I would have resisted. But, brown has slowly been creeping into my mind. First, I found myself admiring the brown tile at the Honolulu Airport. Then, I decided I should move away from my earthquake safe Melmac dinnerware. So, I bought several settings of Heath Ceramics dinnerware.

The Heath colors are subtle, subtle and subtle. Seeing one brown combined with cream or tan plate convinced me that brown could be alright. Some of my favorite design solutions are brown. Does this mean I’m mellowing, or developing, God forbid, good taste? I still resist any attempt to put brown in bathrooms. Brown wall, tiles, fixtures, or accessories should never be used there. I won’t go into details, but how do you know if someone previously had an “episode” in the bathroom if everything isn’t bright white?

Heath Ceramics dinnerware

 

Heath Ceramics, plate colors

 

tile, Honolulu Airport

 

Reid Miles, Blowin' Country

 

Tomoko Miho, Nieman Marcus packaging, 1960s

 

Paul Rand, Idea magazine, 1955

 

Josef Muller-Brockmann, concert poster, 1955

 

Saul Bass, Bonjour Tristesse poster, 1959

 

Will Burtin, Scope magazine, 1951

 

A bad brown bathroom, 1977

 

Squirrel

Tuesday, July 20th, 2010

Reid Miles, Solomon Ilori

This morning during an interview, I was asked, “Where do you find inspiration?” This is a common question, and I understand the curiosity, but it’s complicated. Like every other creative person, I’m inspired by a million tiny details every day. I know the correct answer is, “Well, I just can’t get enough of Alvin Lustig.” That doesn’t work for me. Not that I don’t love Lustig, but there are too many other influences daily.

My mind works much like the dog in Up. I’ll be choosing blue Pantone colors and then, “Squirrel,” I’m doing something else. Today while looking at blue PMS chips, I thought, “Blue Note,” and found myself reading the Blue Note Album Cover Art book. I’d forgotten how truly incredible every cover is. Reid Miles was the in-house designer at Blue Note and designed most of the covers. From 1955 to 1967, he combined minimal abstract forms with an intense color sensibility. While Miles is often associated with Bauhaus rigor, his covers are more closely related to Color Field and Minimalist artists such as Ellsworth Kelly. I often tell people that “cool” is a terrible trap leading to desperate work and endless suffering. I admit, however, that Miles’ covers are cool—the good kind of cool.