Posts Tagged ‘Book Design’

Frozen

Thursday, December 4th, 2014
Blake Little Preservation, Sean Adams, designer, 2014

Blake Little Preservation, Sean Adams, designer, 2014

One of my favorite clients is Blake Little. I’ve known Blake for twenty years. He’s the first call I make when I need a remarkable photographer for a project. Blake is also able to make me look halfway decent in photographs. The upside of this is that I look good in a headshot, the downside is that someone meets me in person and says, “oh, hmm.”

A few years ago, Blake asked me to design his book, Dichotomy, followed by The Company of Men, and Manifest. I’d love to say they are incredibly challenging, but this is proof that it’s hard to go wrong with great content.

Blake’s most recent book, Preservation, is about to be released and there will be an exhibition of the work at the Kopeikin Gallery in February. Blake’s work has an inherent sense of energy. Whether it’s a piercing gaze, or coiled strength, or kinetic motion, the subjects share an intensity of power. The Preservation images have the same quality, but in this case, the energy and motion is frozen. The subjects appear to be unexpectedly trapped in amber. The result is a cross between a Rodin sculpture and frozen figures from Pompeii.

I thought I was being radically alternative to create an ultra-rigid grid and system for the typography as a counterpoint to the fluid imagery. But I have a feeling it’s an instance of a designer getting caught up in the tiny details and saying, “But don’t you see, the missing cross-bar on the ‘A’ changes the meaning entirely.”

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Books on Fire

Saturday, October 25th, 2014
FHK Henrion The Complete Designer

FHK Henrion The Complete Designer

I am quite proud of my most recent project, to build a bookcase in my office at home. It still needs some trim work, but the books are in and nothing has collapsed. The most surprising aspect of the project was how many books I had. Who knew? These are only the design books, there are other bookcases in the house with more. I had quite a few duplicates that I tried donating to the Art Center library, but they didn’t need them. I didn’t want to throw the books away. I considered burning them in the driveway and telling my neighbors they were evil books: Catcher in the Rye, etc.. But I left them in a box on the curb, and they were gone in an hour.

Of course, that doesn’t stop me from buying more. One of my favorite publishers is Unit Editions. It’s a collaboration between Adrian Shaughnessy and Tony Brook in London. They focus on books with incredibly high quality and remarkable content. Rather than producing 25,000 copies of a book about business cards on cheap paper, Unit Editions publishers smaller quantities that will last for generations.

When I hear people ramble on about sustainable practices and how they used recycled paper for their brochure I nod approvingly. But, in the end, isn’t the truly sustainable action to create an artifact that will be used, saved, and not thrown in the trash?

As Lou Danziger told us as students, “Stop buying drugs. Buy books instead.” Very good advice, although as a student, I was spending my money on Cup o’ Noodles not drugs.

After

After

Manuals 1 Design & Identity Guidelines

Manuals 1 Design & Identity Guidelines

Total Design and its pioneering role in graphic design

Total Design and its pioneering role in graphic design

Supergraphics — Transforming Space

Supergraphics — Transforming Space

Supergraphics — Transforming Space

Supergraphics — Transforming Space

Supergraphics — Transforming Space

Supergraphics — Transforming Space

FHK Henrion The Complete Designer

FHK Henrion The Complete Designer

Herb Lubalin American Graphic Designer

Herb Lubalin American Graphic Designer

Manuals 1 Design & Identity Guidelines

Manuals 1 Design & Identity Guidelines

Manuals 1 Design & Identity Guidelines

Manuals 1 Design & Identity Guidelines

Jurriaan Schrofer (1926-90) Restless typographer

Jurriaan Schrofer (1926-90) Restless typographer

Jurriaan Schrofer (1926-90) Restless typographer

Jurriaan Schrofer (1926-90)
Restless typographer

Essays: Scratching the Surface Adrian Shaughnessy

Essays: Scratching the Surface
Adrian Shaughnessy

Ken Garland  Structure and Substance

Ken Garland
Structure and Substance

Ken Garland  Structure and Substance

Ken Garland
Structure and Substance

Supernew Supergraphics

Supernew Supergraphics

Type Only

Type Only

Franklin Mint

Friday, June 13th, 2014
51st Annual of Advertising, Editorial and Television Art & Design

51st Annual of Advertising, Editorial and Television Art & Design

I’ve been asked if I have a favorite typeface. I’d like to consider myself type-tolerant, but I’m actually rather a type snob. Most projects begin with me trying something outlandish such as Behemoth. But, as time passes, I slowly migrate back to Franklin Gothic. When I found the 51st Annual of Advertising and Editorial Design for The Art Director’s Club of New York, I found a gold mine. Giant Franklin Gothic and my favorite shades of orange and yellow. The book was designed by Dennis Mazzella. In the credits, its states: with the help of Kurt Weihs, my friend. I don’t know what that means, so I’ll include it to give credit to all parties. I also love that this book is stamped by my friend Doug Boyd. It’s a double treasure.

I am in love with the unashamed enormous Franklin Gothic slipcase and cover. So much in love that I considered not sharing this so I could file it in my memory bank of possible solutions. And the spine, showing the inductees into the Hall of Fame is wonderful. Everybody gets so hung up on spines having all the information, but really, in this case on a designer’s bookshelf, is anyone going to say, “Well, I dunno. What the hell is that thing?” And how many times have I spent designing countless covers for an annual report because every tiny detail means something to someone in the room. This cover solves that problem. “All we want are the facts. Just the facts, ma’am.”

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Liberty and Freedom in Grids

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

The World of Franklin & Jefferson, cover, 1976

I like odd grids. How’s that for a catchy opening at a cocktail party? Probably not too good. Nevertheless, complicated and unexpected grids are wonderful. One of my favorite examples is the structure for the book, The World of Franklin and Jefferson, created for the exhibition of the same name. United States Information Agency and the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration proposed the exhibition with funding from IBM. The exhibit toured New York, Paris, Warsaw, London, Mexico City, Chicago, and Los Angeles and was one of the last major works completed by the Eames Office. The accompanying book’s structure is, let’s be honest, bizarre. There are almost no margins. The italic captions have their own column in the center of the page. The images seem to invade the text like wild animals. Clearly, there is a structure under here I do not understand. But I love it. It’s a world of wackadoodle grids. Now, that’s a good title for a new design book.

The World of Franklin & Jefferson, spread, 1976

 

The World of Franklin & Jefferson, spread, 1976

 

The World of Franklin & Jefferson, spread, 1976

 

The World of Franklin & Jefferson, spread, 1976

Seven Thousand Pelts in the Bins

Monday, October 15th, 2012

The Knockabout Club Alongshore by C.A. Stephens, 1883

At lunch today, we discussed which fiction books changed each of our lives. People talked about Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, Play It as It Lays by Joan Didion, anything by Walt Whitman, and The Last Tycoon by F. Scott Fitzgerald. When the group asked me to list my top three, I admit I was ashamed to admit the truth. “Hmm, well, hmm,” I said in a scholarly tone, “I’m quite fond of anything by Raymond Carver. And, of course, Grace Paley.” I did not tell the whole truth. Yes, I do like Raymond Carver, but one of my favorite books is one I had at my grandparents’ house. It’s The Knockabout Club Alongshore by C.A. Stephens. It doesn’t have interesting symbols, metaphors, or complex narrative structure. It’s a standard issue boy’s adventure book about “The adventures of a party of young men on a trip from Boston to the land of the midnight sun.”

I know every page and spent hours as a kid staring at the maps of Nova Scotia and etchings of sailing adventures. The Knockabout Club was published in 1883. No, I did not read it when it was first released. When you’re eight, and there are icebergs, polar bears, Vikings, and the northern lights the publication date doesn’t matter.

            The deck—when we were able to catch sight of it for “skulps” (seal cub scalps)—was almost slippery with gore.

Lines like these are thrilling to any young boy. No worries, I do recognize now that clubbing seal cubs for scalps is not okay. I look at the book now, and am impressed with the actual design. The bright cover screams sailing adventure. I love the detailed initial caps, or in some instances, initial words. For years, I’ve wanted to go to Antarctica. Now I know the genesis of this desire. I am, however, a little confused as to why my grandparents gave me a book from 1883 to read while my friends were reading Deathwatch.

The Knockabout Club Alongshore by C.A. Stephens, 1883

 

The Knockabout Club Alongshore by C.A. Stephens, 1883

The Knockabout Club Alongshore by C.A. Stephens, 1883

The Knockabout Club Alongshore by C.A. Stephens, 1883

The Knockabout Club Alongshore by C.A. Stephens, 1883

The Knockabout Club Alongshore by C.A. Stephens, 1883